Revenge Porn

Revenge Porn [Video]


Warning: Adult third-party content may offend some readers

Protect Victims: #EndRevengePorn Now!

Have you ever seen an embarrassing photo of yourself? You know the type, a notification pops up on Facebook and the picture you see makes you cringe. Now imagine getting a notification that includes your name, but this time when you open it up you see something criminal, something you can’t unsee, and sadly something everyone else can look at too.This time, you see yourself naked and unconscious.

My name is Chrissy Chambers. Some of you probably know me from the YouTube channel BriaAndChrissy that I run with my girlfriend Bria, but even those of you have been following my life and work for years don’t know this story.

When I was 18 years old, I started a long-distance relationship with a man who was 6 years older than me. As you might expect, soon enough the relationship grew strained and we broke up. I still cannot believe what happened next.

Before the relationship ended, and without my knowledge or consent, my ex filmed himself having sex with me, and when we broke up he posted them online and they were shared to over 30 pornography sites.

It wasn’t until two years after they were posted, when a link to one of those videos was emailed to me, that I found out they existed or even that this sexual encounter had taken place.

Stripped of my dignity

When I first saw them I felt like I’d been stripped of my dignity. Each one included my full name, and my ex had included text calling me a slut and a horrible role model. By the time I found them, they had been viewed tens of thousands of times. Life as I had known it ended. It was like I had been hit in the chest and couldn’t catch my breath.

It only got worse when I found out that there was nothing I could do to get them taken down. There are currently no federal laws in the United States that criminalize “revenge porn,” meaning sexually explicit photos or videos posted online without consent.

How is it possible that this practice is legal? How can there be no consequences for the perpetrators who commit such horrific acts? How would you feel if this happened to you, or your sister, or your best friend?

My ex posted those videos for revenge, plain and simple. He wanted to hurt me, and to tarnish my reputation. But he won’t succeed.

I am standing up to fight back, not just for me, but for the tens of thousands of other women (and men) who have been put in this same situation with no way to defend themselves. With the help of our lawyers at the firm McAllister Olivarius, we are bringing the first ever civil lawsuit against revenge pornography in the UK.

The reality is that what happened to me was a form of sexual assault, and it should be treated that way by the law. No one should be able to get away with posting explicit photos or videos of another person without their consent, or profiting off running a website that hosts that content.

A bill that would criminalize “revenge porn” in the United States is currently being written by multiple members of Congress, but it will take a lot of public support in order to convince them to push it through.Please stand with me and call on Congress to end this horrific practice once and for all.

I do not want anyone else to ever have to go through what I did, and with your help we can make that happen.

Source: Change Org

I was a victim of revenge porn. I don’t want anyone else to face this

My ex tried to sell nude photos of me on eBay

My ex tried to sell nude photos of me on eBay and put them on a porn site. But I fought back and am pushing to make this illegal
 
In February 2010, my ex-boyfriend, Joey (name changed) and I had a fight over a skirt I wore to work. He deemed the skirt too short. He shamed me, called me a hooker, and accused me of sleeping with all my male friends. After watching his jealousy and possessiveness steadily increase over our seven-month relationship, I was at my breaking point. We were over.

The day after the fight, Joey called me at 11:53pm. He was livid. He said he was looking on my Facebook page and from what he could see it was clear I was sleeping with at least three other guys. I tried to rationalize with him, to convince him he was mistaken. But he was too far-gone to hear me.

He threatened to start an eBay auction. If I didn’t tell him the truth about how many other guys I was sleeping with, he said he was going to auction off a CD of 88 naked images of me that I allowed him to take after three months of relentless pressure. He said he would send links to the auction to my friends and family, to people at the college where I teach. I shook with desperate fear. I knew no words would change his mind. Joey had flown into a rage, uncontrollable and impervious to reason. I knew my fate, and my only defense was to call the police. I begged and pleaded for him not to carry out his threat.

I will destroy you

Then he said the words that would change the course of my life: “I will destroy you.”

I called the Baltimore County police and through my sobs tried to explain what was happening and why I needed help. The dispatcher sent an officer to my home who looked down on me as I explained that I wanted him to stop a threat. It was the first of many times I would be told, “There is nothing I can do. No crime had been committed.” And at that point, no crime had been committed. I was frantic over a threat, which to the bored officer was nothing to worry about. To me, it was a portent of the misery I’d soon suffer.

The auction went live the following afternoon. I received about three emails from eBay informing me that, “Joseph Mann thought you might like this item on eBay” The link read: (Name of college)MD English Professor Nude Photos!

Gorge rose into my throat. I gagged and ran to the kitchen sink. Then I shifted into damage control mode. Since Joey and I were still Facebook friends, I received alerts in my newsfeed that he had posted links to the auction on five of the college’s Facebook pages. I sent messages to the pages’ administrators explaining what was happening. I would learn in the weeks to come that a few students and at least three colleagues followed the links, logged into eBay, and saw the auction.

More emails arrived from friends, my ex-husband, and my babysitter. They had received the same messages from eBay and were concerned. I reported Joey for abuse on Yahoo!; I reported his Facebook page; I contacted eBay and told them about the auction. Damage control consumed me for at least 48 hours. I called the police and again an officer stood in my home, looked down on me and said, “Nothing we can do. No crime here.” I went to a local police precinct hoping someone else would know more than the cops I spoke with. I stood by fighting tears while three officers looked over the auction printouts I brought and snickered. The blond one who finally came over to talk to me seemed amused. It was my first experience with overt victim blaming. And because it came from someone charged to protect and serve, it drove my shame and embarrassment to a paralyzing level.

For over a year thereafter, even though the auctions were down, and I blocked Joey’s email addresses and phone numbers, I oscillated between panic and persistent anxiety. I would wake up at 3am and check my email, my Facebook page, eBay, then Google my name, a ritual I performed three times before I could settle back down. In September 2011, I was thrown into panic again after I read an anonymous email alerting me to an online profile that featured nude pictures of me.

I Googled my name, and there I was, on a porn website. The profile included my full name, the city and state where I live, the name of the college where I teach and the campus. There was a solicitation – HOT FOR TEACHER? WELL, COME GET IT! The site had been up for 14 days and had been viewed over 3,000 times. He was pretending to be me. There were “friends” who commented on my pictures. He was chatting with people as if it were me. My stomach hurt. I held my breath and printed every page of comments, all seventeen of them.

I snatched the pages from the printer and ran to my car. Once again, I would find myself being shamed, by the same officer from the year prior, and being told, “There is nothing we can do. No crime has been committed.” I explained to this cop that I was in danger of being stalked. My name was on that site. He said, “If anything happens, call us. Then we can do something.”

Afraid to be in public, I raced home and called the Maryland state police and the Baltimore division of the FBI. I left messages explaining what happened. Then I called my therapist who was treating me for symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder for the past year and cancelled my session. I was too scared to leave my house. She insisted I go on medical leave from work.

Another 48 hours were spent engrossed in damage control. A senior administrator at the college denied my request for medical leave, claiming that I perpetrated the incident. I had to make a case why I needed to go on leave. It was humiliating. I feared for my job.

This torture was never going to end

That night, I sunk into despair so deep I felt nothing. Because of the permanence of the internet, and lack of legislation, this torture was never going to end. I seriously contemplated ending my life. I would have been successful if it weren’t for three things, my dog needed to be let out, my mom called, and the pills I took weren’t fatal.

Surviving the attempt wasn’t the turning point that pushed me to action. It was a conversation with a state trooper two weeks later who was assigned my case that did. He gently explained the current laws and the limits of those laws to me. I was frustrated and blurted out, “Well, then I’m going to change the laws.”

His reply was, “Annmarie, if you can do that, it would make my job a lot easier.”

So I set out to keep my word to the trooper, the first law enforcement official to show genuine kindness and compassion.

On 2 February 2011, I testified before the Maryland General Assembly’s judicial committee in support of Senate bills 175 and 107. Senate Bill 175 passed into law on 10 April 2012 and went into effect on 1 October 2012. The bill amended Maryland’s misuse of electronic mail statute to include all forms of electronic communication. It was a step forward, but a small one. There are still amendments needed, and they shall come in time.

I have since aligned myself with a coalition of powerful women who share my dedication to seeing legislation that makes revenge porn a crime passed in all 50 states. We are advocates, activists and legal researchers. As a result of my continued involvement with this issue, in September 2013, a representative from Delegate Jon Cardin’s office contacted me via the End Revenge Porn website where I am listed as the Maryland legislative coordinator.

Del Cardin invited me to provide input and testify in support of a new revenge porn bill that was being drafted and that was being introduced into the 2014 legislative session. Had this bill been in place in 2010, my perpetrator would have been convicted of a felony, and I would have peace that he would not exact such punishment on me or any other women.

Since I don’t have that peace, I still face some of the fears I did the day I first brought my case to law enforcement, but I have embraced my role as the voice for those who have not yet found their voices. And I will speak up.

…read more

Source: The Guardian

Sexting has lead to rise of revenge porn and ‘sextortion’

YOU have 20 minutes until I post this photo …

Nineteen-year-old Sarah* stared back at the message on the screen of her phone, terrified. As she sat there, stunned and contemplating what to do next, another ominous message pinged: “19 minutes …”

The high school graduate with a bright future was being taunted by an impulsive decision she had made five years earlier.

SEXTING: Push to make revenge porn a crime

When she was 14, she had taken a semi-naked photo of herself. Now, all these years later, that photo somehow had made its way into the hands of a total stranger.

A man she didn’t know was trying to blackmail her into sending him more revealing photos of herself.

If she refused, he threatened to make that embarrassing image, taken in her early high school years, public.

“You have 18 minutes …” the next message beeped.

Acting Children’s eSafety Commissioner Andree Wright describes this kind of behaviour as “sextortion”, and says her office is unfortunately seeing an eyebrow-raising upswing in the number of these sorts of incidents.

The Commission’s latest quarterly report identifies a fourfold rise in the number of complaints lodged about the non-consensual distribution of sexual images. In the three months to the end of June, sexting complaints accounted for only 4 per cent of the inquiries the Canberra-based cyber taskforce received.

In the three months since then, they made up 16 per cent of all complaints.

“We are pleased that more young people are coming to us about this issue,” Wright says.

“We do hear from young people several years after the images are taken, when they come back to haunt them, and others when they are right in the moment when they are under pressure.”

The eSafety Commission now has a pointer on the front of its website to help children who are the victims of so-called “revenge porn” attacks – or the non-consensual sharing of intimate images – seek immediate help.

“It’s effectively child sexual abuse material,”

“It’s effectively child sexual abuse material,” Wright says, which allows her office, in conjunction with police, to act quickly.

Fortunately, Sarah contacted the commission for help as the sextorter kept up his sinister countdown. Before long, a local detective was on the phone with the harasser and Sarah never heard from him again.

But she is just one of many Australian teens and pre-teens who are being pressured and even blackmailed into sending intimate images of themselves to boys.

Sometimes it’s by the young guys they are in relationships with, and other times, by boys they know who now think it’s OK to request naked photos of girls.

Melinda Tankard Reist, a writer and educator, travels around schools in Queensland and other states, talking about these issues. She says she hears frightening stories on almost a daily basis of the pressure young women are under to “sext”.

“I’ve had really young girls telling me shocking stories of threats and blackmail, when they’re being told if you don’t send me an image I’m going to spread rumours about you. It’s a problem everywhere I go and it’s getting worse,” she says.

“Even younger girls who are 11, 12 and 13 are showing me requests on their phones for images.

“ They are asking me how do they say no.”

Tankard Reist says easily accessible hardcore pornography, which young people are being exposed to at younger and younger ages, has a lot to answer for.

“Schools are reeling. They can’t keep up. Child-on-child sexual assaults are on the rise at rates never before seen, and all of the authorities say it is because of exposure
to pornography,”
she says. “It is an unprecedented attack on the healthy sexual development of young people and it is out of control. Anyone who cares about the welfare of children and young people needs to act on this.”

On the Gold Coast, Di Macleod has also noticed a worrying trend during the past decade, in the stories she hears from the clients who walk through the door of her Centre Against Sexual Violence.

“The type of sex acts being coerced, as people report them to us, and the intensity and violence, both physically and sexually, that goes along with those acts, has really increased over time,” McLeod says.

She is concerned these similarities are linked to the exposure of young people to violent pornography at the click of a device, and that this easily accessible pornography is warping the views of a whole generation about what constitutes a normal healthy relationship.

“I think we are seeing a new type or normal in terms of sexual expectations out there in the community, and we see the end of that continuum when things go wrong,” she say.

“In the last 10 years, the kind of things we are seeing is a huge increase in anal rape, a huge increase in object penetration, an increase in more than one person being present, and an increase in the filming or recording of those acts. When you look at all of that together, it starts to add up.”

Tankard Reist and Macleod are part of an increasingly vocal group that wants a lot more consideration given to the impact that readily-available pornography is having on young people.

They also have won support from National Children’s Commissioner Megan Mitchell, who also thinks more research needs to be done on the psychological impact that exposure to pornography is having on young people.

“I would be very happy to work in concert with others, to team up with others and to do some comprehensive research about children’s experiences in this area,” she says.

*Sarah’s name has been changed

Thanks Change Org, TheGuardian and for reading Revenge Porn

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Dr Don
Founder/Admin The Internet Crime Fighters Org, Author The Internet Users Handbook, See more http://about.me/drdony
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Comments

  1. Reply

    Revenge Porn Is Where Google And Social Media Draw The Line https://www.truthfinder.com/infomania/safety/revenge-porn-google-search/

  2. Reply

    Facebook fix to combat ‘revenge porn’ FACEBOOK is adding tools from today to make it easier for users to report so-called “revenge porn” and stop images being shared. http://www.news.com.au/technology/online/social/facebook-fix-to-combat-revenge-porn/news-story/a21ff2110c72182a8218a6d9a19ed921

  3. Reply

    Facebook addresses revenge porn with tech to prevent people from re-sharing intimate images https://techcrunch.com/2017/04/05/facebook-addresses-revenge-porn-with-tech-to-prevent-people-from-re-sharing-intimate-images/

  4. Reply

    5 Steps Every Victim Of Revenge Porn Should Consider Non-consensual pornography or “revenge porn” can be eliminated right now. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/5-steps-every-victim-of-revenge-porn-should-consider_us_58f4d345e4b048372700d9f7

  5. Reply

    Revenge Porn Is Now Officially Illegal Under Marine And Navy Law. After revelations that hundreds Marines may have been involved in sharing nude photos of women service members, the US Navy Regulations are getting an update. https://www.buzzfeed.com/claudiakoerner/revenge-porn-is-now-officially-illegal-under-marine-and?utm_term=.trRZMb0w9#.qjkVLPZml

  6. Reply

    FACEBOOK SNUB Revenge porn victim blasts Facebook after it took 20 requests to remove nude photos of her posted by jilted ex The mum of three was so embarrassed by the pictures she quit her job and considered suicide https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/3396963/revenge-porn-victim-blasts-facebook-after-it-took-20-requests-to-remove-nude-photos-of-her-posted-by-jilted-ex/

  7. Reply

    Mother-of-three revenge porn victim, 45, blasts Facebook after she had to beg TWENTY times to have naked pictures of her taken down leaving her feeling suicidal http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4440646/Revenge-porn-victim-begged-Facebook-pictures-down.html

  8. Reply

    ‘IT’S STILL ONLINE AND I CAN’T GET IT OFF’ Revenge porn victim tells Loose Women how she is losing battle to get photos of her baby daughter off smutty website Nikki Elliott said she was devastated that her daughter’s image had been shared on the vile site https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/3403502/revenge-porn-victim-loose-women/

  9. Reply

    Facebook Has Figured Out How to Stem the Revenge Porn Tide A.I. now blocks the distribution of non-consensual images on the most popular social media platform ever. And it’s the same technology you may have already used https://www.inc.com/john-brandon/facebook-just-put-a-nail-in-the-revenge-porn-coffin.html

  10. Reply

    Mischa Barton appears in court for ‘revenge porn’ case, must wait until June to testify http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/mischa-barton-testifies-revenge-porn-case-article-1.3104050

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