Child Porn [Video]

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pornChild Pornography

Federal and state laws make it a crime to produce, possess, distribute, or sell pornographic materials that exploit or portray a minor (under the age of 18). Increasingly, child pornography laws are being utilized to punish use of computer technology and the Internet to obtain, share, and distribute pornographic material involving children, including images and films.

Source: FindLaw

Child Pornography and Selfies: What You Need to Know

Although it was used prior, the term “selfie” quickly became part of the mainstream lexicon in 2013 when its use became so common that it was named the “Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year.” For the uninitiated, a selfie is a self-portrait photograph that’s often taken with a camera phone, webcam, or digital camera. The explosion of social media networks and the rise of the camera phone have created endless opportunities for anyone to share their self-portraits with the world.

This emerging technology is a natural fit for most teens and, generally, the worst offense they might commit is sharing too frequently. There is, however, also a potential for criminal liability under child pornography laws when selfies involve underage nudity or sexual situations.

Definition of Child Pornography

Since technology moves much faster than legislation, crimes committed via social media are often prosecuted by applying existing statutes. Federal law defines child pornography as any visual depiction of sexually explicit conduct involving a minor, and the United States Department of Justice may prosecute offenses occurring across state or international borders and almost any offense involving the Internet.

Federal charges need not be exclusive, however, and an individual may face criminal liability under both U.S. and state child pornography laws, which are largely similar to and sometimes more comprehensive than the federal statutes. Many states further define elements of the crime, such as what constitutes sexually explicit conduct or who is considered a minor. For example:

Massachusetts extends its child pornography laws to include participating, with lascivious intent, in the depiction of a nude minor in any visual material.

In South Carolina, the judge or jury may infer that the participants in alleged child pornography are minors based on the material’s title or text.

Utah’s definition of “sexually explicit content” includes actual or simulated “explicit representation of defecation or urination functions.”

Application of Child Pornography Laws to Selfies

If an adult takes a sexually explicit picture of a minor and shares it via social media or text message, that adult will likely have run afoul of some child pornography laws. But what about a minor who takes selfies and sends them discreetly to another teen? What if the receiver then forwards the photos to others? Have they violated any laws? In many states, the answer is yes.

Though their laws were created to protect minors from exploitation caused by others, states are prosecuting minors under child pornography statutes for sending nude or otherwise lurid self-portraits, even when the minors sent the selfies without coercion. The common quirk in the laws is that there is no exception for taking or distributing sexually explicit pictures of oneself. Thus, a high school student sending a racy seflie to a boyfriend or girlfriend could subject both themselves and the receiver to prosecution for child pornography. If the picture makes its way around other social circles through online or direct sharing, anyone who received or distributed the photo could also find themselves open to charges.

Direction of Future Laws

The overall trend on both the federal and state levels is toward broader definitions of child pornography with increased prosecutions and harsher penalties for those connected to it. One of the gray areas that’s getting greater attention in the age of social media is what constitutes “possession” of child pornography. Most social media sites can now store large caches of images indefinitely on the Internet, lessening the need for viewers to download files to their computers. Other services, such as Snapchat, can be used to distribute selfies that auto-delete themselves after a few seconds (though the receiver may create a screen capture before the image disappears).

Since merely viewing child pornography is illegal in many states, browsing a website or knowingly receiving illegal images would be criminal activity in those jurisdictions. Other states’ child pornography laws, however, have “possession” requirements that are somewhat archaic in the digital age. The shortcomings of these statutes were exemplified by a pair of high court decisions from Oregon and New York:

A 2011 decision by the Oregon Supreme Court reversed the conviction of a man charged under the state’s Encouraging Child Sexual Abuse statute since the child pornography in question was only accessed on the Internet and he never ‘possessed’ or ‘controlled’ the images, as required by the law.

Similarly, in 2012, the New York Court of Appeals held that viewing child pornography online does constitute the “knowing procurement or possession of those files” and reversed some charges against the defendant.

Both of these states and others have since taken steps to close such loopholes and expand the reach of their child pornography laws so as to include developing and future technologies, but this is an area of law that is rapidly evolving to meet the times. For teens sending or exchanging risqué pictures, their concern can no longer be limited to whether it may bring embarrassment or even parental and academic discipline. Instead, they need to also consider whether that sexually explicit selfie can get them prosecuted under child pornography laws.

,,,read more

 Source: FindLaw

Child Pedophiles Predators

When children go online, they have direct and immediate access to friends, family, and complete strangers, which can put unsuspecting children at great risk. Children who meet and communicate with strangers online are easy prey for Internet predators. Predators have easy and anonymous access to children online where they can conceal their identity and roam without limit. Often, we have an image of sexual predators lurking around school playgrounds or hiding behind bushes scoping out their potential victims, but the reality is that today’s sexual predators search for victims while hiding behind a computer screen, taking advantage of the anonymity the Internet offers.

“People who do not believe that their children could ever become victimized online are living in an unrealistic world.  Regardless of if your child makes ‘As’ or not, that child has the potential to become victimized through online technologies.  I think it is very important for parents of all socioeconomic status and with all different roles in society to take this problem very seriously.”  Melissa Morrow, Supervisory Special Agent, Child Exploitation Squad, FBI

Predators Access to Kids

The anonymity of the Internet provides the perfect camouflage for a seasoned predator to operate. The predator’s knowledge of certain teenage subjects is as accurate as his or her calculated ability to speak teens’ online lingo. Offline, pedophiles have typically operated in isolation. Never before have pedophiles had the opportunity to communicate so freely and directly with each other as they do online. Their communication on the Internet provides validation—or virtual validation—for their behavior. They share their conquests, real and imagined. They discuss ways to contact and lure children online and exchange tips on seduction techniques, as well as tips on the avoidance of law enforcement detection.

What Fuels Internet Predators?

  • Easy and anonymous access to children
  • Risky online behavior of youth
  • Virtual validation
  • Law enforcement challenges
  • East access to “a la carte” child pornography

The Internet has fueled the deviant sexual behavior of predators due to their easy access to both child pornography and to children. Both ignite the sexual appetite of pedophiles. À la carte child pornography depicting kids of all shapes, sizes, ethnicities, and ages (even toddlers and infants!), is only a mouse click away.

Direct access to unsuspecting children via e-mail, instant messaging, social networking sites, and chat rooms simplifies the sexual predator’s efforts to contact and groom children. Additionally, some teens are placing themselves at risk and willingly talk about sexual matters with online acquaintances.

“Predators are hiding behind the anonymity of the Internet to target kid, to entice kids online–to try to persuade them to meet them in the physical world.” —Ernie Allen, President & CEO, National Center for Missing and Exploited Children

What is the Profile of a Predator?

  • Blends into society
  • Is typically clean cut and outwardly law abiding
  • Is usually white, middle-aged or younger, and male
  • Uses position in society to throw off suspicion
  • Can rise to be a pillar of society while actively pursuing children
  • Often engages in activities involving children
  • Appears trusting to both parents and child

“Predators are in all professions.  Unfortunately, we have seen doctors, lawyers, law enforcement and clergy.  There is really no common trait.  In fact, many of them are drawn to those particular professions which give them access to children”  —Mary Beth Buchanan, U.S. District Attorney, Western Pennsylvania

Source: Internet Safety101

Children as young as NINE sexting naked snaps amid fears they could fall into hands of paedophiles

BY MARK BRANAGAN

Police warn youngsters their images could end up on social media or porn sites and say: ‘Once you press send, it’s gone’

West Yorkshire Police are trying to educate children about the dangers of sending nude selfies

Girls as young as nine are “sexting” naked snaps of themselves not realising the images could fall into the hands of sexual predators .

West Yorkshire Police say 121 cases of children sending nude selfies to each other were reported to them last year, including the case of a girl aged nine.

In the three months before March this year, the force had already logged 53 more incidents.

This week, officers have been patrolling patrol bus and train stations across the county to raise awareness among youngsters of Child Sexual Exploitation.

Once a photo has been sent to someone there’s no telling where it might end up

A West Yorkshire Police spokesman said: “If you share an image of yourself online by photo, text or video, via your phone, tablet or computer always think first ‘Would I be OK with anyone and everyone seeing this?’

“Any image of yourself that you send, can and might be shared by the person you sent it to. Once you press send, it is no longer in your control.

“If you share a ‘nude’ or ‘underwear shot’ even with someone you trust, you are not able to control who they forward it to or where they save it.

“It can be sent on to anyone or posted anywhere on the internet. It could end up on social networking sites or even porn sites.

Children as young as nine are sexting

“Once they have your image, they have it forever and could even use it against you.

…read more

Source: Mirror UK

Children as young as 10 years old are sending sexually-explicit images to friends

THE bar keeps getting lower and lower. Or, younger and younger.

Children as young as 10 are sending naked pictures of themselves to friends and classmates via text and social media, according to a leading child psychologist.

“I don’t reckon (sexting in primary school) is as rare as people think,” Michael Carr-Gregg told news.com.au.

“I’d say it’s at 20 per cent (of all students).”

It was reported on Monday that school principals were turning to sexual assault groups for help with the fallout when young people sent and received messages containing nudity or sexual content.

The statistics suggest the problem is bigger than previously thought, and getting bigger all the time.

An Australian Institute of Criminology report from December showed a staggering jump in pre-teens’ use of mobile phones for sharing sexual pictures and videos.

It revealed that 38 per cent of teens aged 13-15 had sent a sexual picture to another person and 62 per cent had received a sexually-explicit image or video of a peer.

Almost half of girls aged 13-15 has sent one image to another person in the past 12 months and 34 per cent had sent between two and five images.

Girls were sending more pictures than boys in that same age group: Only 30 per cent of boys aged 13-15 had sent one image to another person and 27 per cent had sent multiple images.

The reasons differed for boys and girls, too.

Male teens cited the main reason for sexting was to be fun/flirty and the second biggest reason was to keep a girl’s attention.

Female teens said they also wanted to be fun and flirty but almost 20 per cent of the time they were sending images as “a present to a boyfriend” and 13 per cent of the time they were doing it because they were pressured.

Mr Carr-Gregg said it was “naive” to think sexting was happening only via text. He said the results are “catastrophic”.

“Children are getting their hands on phones from older siblings and being signed up to social media too young by their parents.

“We’re giving them a passport into a very adult world and they don’t have the maturity to manage that.”

Moral and ethical considerations aside, there are also legal concerns. Legal Aid NSW released a statement in May explaining the risk.

“Thousands of children and teenagers are at risk of a criminal record — which can seriously impact their life forever — for sharing nude photos, even if the subject agrees,” lawyer Julianne Elliot said.

“It is a little known fact that 16-year-olds can legally have sex, but if they take nude photos and share them with one another, they could face serious criminal charges.”

Social media sites where picture sharing is popular and private, including Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat, all have age restrictions banning those younger than 13 years from opening and owning an account of their own.

But parents are often pressured to intervene and speed up the process for their children — to open an account in their name. Experts say that’s a bad idea.

…read more

Source:  News Com AU

Revenge pornography victims as young as 11, investigation finds

Children as young as 11 are among more than 1,000 alleged victims of revenge porn who reported offences in the first year of the new law coming into effect, it has been revealed.

In April 2015, it became an offence to share private sexual photographs or films without the subject’s consent.

The BBC analysed Freedom of Information requests from 31 forces in England and Wales between April and December.

Online safety charities said victims were left “hugely damaged”.

Revenge porn refers to the act of a partner or ex-partner purposefully distributing images or videos of a sexual nature without the other person’s consent.

Our analysis shows:

  • There were 1,160 reported incidents of revenge pornography from April 2015 to December 2015
  • Three victims were 11 years old with some 30% of offences involving young people under 19
  • The average age of a revenge porn victim was 25
  • Around 11% of reported offences resulted in the alleged perpetrator being charged, 7% in a caution and 5% in a community resolution
  • Some 61% of reported offences resulted in no action being taken against the alleged perpetrator. Among the main reasons cited by police include a lack of evidence or the victim withdrawing support
  • Facebook was used by perpetrators in 68% of cases where social media was mentioned in reports. Then came Instagram (12%) followed by Snapchat (5%)

She said: “The effect on victims is often pervasive and long-lasting.

“Whilst they have been the victim of a crime, often individuals internalise feelings of guilt and shame, which can negatively affect an individual’s sense of self-worth and self-esteem.

“Victim-blaming attitudes only exacerbate these feelings. Some feel so isolated and overwhelmed they consider suicide.”

…read more

Source:  BBC Com

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Dr Don
Founder/Admin The Internet Crime Fighters Org, Internet Users Handbook, Author The Internet Users Handbook, See more http://about.me/drdony
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