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Let Us Get Serious About Sexting; It Only Takes One, Just One, Sexting Message to Unleash the Dangers of Sexting

Children as young as 10 years old are sending sexually-explicit images to friends

Rohan Smith

THE bar keeps getting lower and lower. Or, younger and younger.

Children as young as 10 are sending naked pictures of themselves to friends and classmates via text and social media, according to a leading child psychologist.

“I don’t reckon (sexting in primary school) is as rare as people think,” Michael Carr-Gregg told news.com.au.

“I’d say it’s at 20 per cent (of all students).”

It was reported on Monday that school principals were turning to sexual assault groups for help with the fallout when young people sent and received messages containing nudity or sexual content.

The statistics suggest the problem is bigger than previously thought, and getting bigger all the time.

An Australian Institute of Criminology report from December showed a staggering jump in pre-teens’ use of mobile phones for sharing sexual pictures and videos.

It revealed that 38 per cent of teens aged 13-15 had sent a sexual picture to another person and 62 per cent had received a sexually-explicit image or video of a peer.

Almost half of girls aged 13-15 has sent one image to another person in the past 12 months and 34 per cent had sent between two and five images.

Girls were sending more pictures than boys in that same age group: Only 30 per cent of boys aged 13-15 had sent one image to another person and 27 per cent had sent multiple images.

The reasons differed for boys and girls, too.

Male teens cited the main reason for sexting was to be fun/flirty and the second biggest reason was to keep a girl’s attention.

Female teens said they also wanted to be fun and flirty but almost 20 per cent of the time they were sending images as “a present to a boyfriend” and 13 per cent of the time they were doing it because they were pressured.

Mr Carr-Gregg said it was “naive” to think sexting was happening only via text. He said the results are “catastrophic”.

“Children are getting their hands on phones from older siblings and being signed up to social media too young by their parents.

“We’re giving them a passport into a very adult world and they don’t have the maturity to manage that.”

Moral and ethical considerations aside, there are also legal concerns. Legal Aid NSW released a statement in May explaining the risk.

“Thousands of children and teenagers are at risk of a criminal record — which can seriously impact their life forever — for sharing nude photos, even if the subject agrees,” lawyer Julianne Elliot said.

“It is a little known fact that 16-year-olds can legally have sex, but if they take nude photos and share them with one another, they could face serious criminal charges.”

Social media sites where picture sharing is popular and private, including Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat, all have age restrictions banning those younger than 13 years from opening and owning an account of their own.

But parents are often pressured to intervene and speed up the process for their children — to open an account in their name. Experts say that’s a bad idea.

…read more

Source:  News Com AU

Sextortion: Cybersecurity, teenagers, and remote sexual assault

Benjamin Wittes, Cody Poplin, Quinta Jurecic, and Clara Spera

It started with an email from an unknown sender with the subject line, “Read this and be smart.”

When the victim opened the email, she found sexually explicit photos of herself attached and information that detailed where she worked. Following that were details of her personal life: her husband and her three kids. And there was a demand.

The demand made this hack different: This computer intrusion was not about money. The perpetrator wanted a pornographic video of the victim. And if she did not send it within one day, he threatened to publish the images already in his possession, and “let [her] family know about [her] dark side.” If she contacted law enforcement, he promised he would publish the photos on the Internet too.

Later in the day, to underscore his seriousness, the hacker followed up with another email threatening the victim: “You have six hours.”

This victim knew her correspondent only as yosoylammer@hotmail.com, but the attacker turned out to be a talented 32-year-old proficient in multiple computer languages. Located in Santa Ana, California, his name was Luis Mijangos

On November 5, 2009, yosolammer@hotmail.com sent an email to another woman with the subject line: “who hacked your account READ it!!!” In the email, Mijangos attached a naked photo of the victim and told her “im [sic] in control of your computers right now.”

Mijangos had other identities too: Some emails came from christ@yahoo.com; sometimes he was zapotin@hotmail.com.  According to court records in his federal criminal prosecution, Mijangos used at least 30 different screen names to avoid detection.  But all emails came from the same IP address in Santa Ana.

Law enforcement authorities investigating the emails soon realized that the threatening communications were part of a larger series of crimes. Mijangos, they discovered, had tricked scores of women and teenage girls into downloading malware onto their computers.

The malicious software he employed provided access to all files, photos, and videos on the infected computers. It allowed him to see everything typed on their keyboards.  And it allowed him to, at will, turn on any web camera and microphone attached to the computer, a capability he used to watch, listen, and record his victims without their knowledge. He kept detailed files on many of his victims, at times gathering information for more than a month, and filling his files with information he could later use to manipulate his victims.

Child Pornography and Selfies: What You Need to Know

Although it was used prior, the term “selfie” quickly became part of the mainstream lexicon in 2013 when its use became so common that it was named the “Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year.” For the uninitiated, a selfie is a self-portrait photograph that’s often taken with a camera phone, webcam, or digital camera. The explosion of social media networks and the rise of the camera phone have created endless opportunities for anyone to share their self-portraits with the world.

This emerging technology is a natural fit for most teens and, generally, the worst offense they might commit is sharing too frequently. There is, however, also a potential for criminal liability under child pornography laws when selfies involve underage nudity or sexual situations.

Definition of Child Pornography

Since technology moves much faster than legislation, crimes committed via social media are often prosecuted by applying existing statutes. Federal law defines child pornography as any visual depiction of sexually explicit conduct involving a minor, and the United States Department of Justice may prosecute offenses occurring across state or international borders and almost any offense involving the Internet.

Federal charges need not be exclusive, however, and an individual may face criminal liability under both U.S. and state child pornography laws

…read more

Source:  FindLaw

Revenge pornography victims as young as 11, investigation finds

By Peter Sherlock

In April 2015, it became an offence to share private sexual photographs or films without the subject’s consent.

The BBC analysed Freedom of Information requests from 31 forces in England and Wales between April and December.

Online safety charities said victims were left “hugely damaged”.

Revenge porn refers to the act of a partner or ex-partner purposefully distributing images or videos of a sexual nature without the other person’s consent.

Our analysis shows:

  • There were 1,160 reported incidents of revenge pornography from April 2015 to December 2015
  • Three victims were 11 years old with some 30% of offences involving young people under 19
  • The average age of a revenge porn victim was 25
  • Around 11% of reported offences resulted in the alleged perpetrator being charged, 7% in a caution and 5% in a community resolution
  • Some 61% of reported offences resulted in no action being taken against the alleged perpetrator. Among the main reasons cited by police include a lack of evidence or the victim withdrawing support
  • Facebook was used by perpetrators in 68% of cases where social media was mentioned in reports. Then came Instagram (12%) followed by Snapchat (5%)
  • See the data here

    The new law was introduced after campaigners lobbied MPs to make it a criminal offence.

    Previously, convictions for this type of offence were sought under existing copyright or harassment laws.

    It covers images shared on and offline without the subject’s permission and with the intent to cause harm. Physical distribution of images is also covered.

    An NSPCC spokesman said: “It is shocking that children as young as 11 are becoming victims of revenge porn – and underlines the urgent need for action by social media sites to improve safety.

    “Young people also need to be aware of the serious risks of sending explicit material or photos of themselves.”

    Laura Higgins, of the Revenge Porn Helpline, said being a victim was a “hugely distressing, damaging and violating experience”.

    The woman, 17 when nude photos were published online, said no action had been taken when she reported the matter to police

    She said: “The effect on victims is often pervasive and long-lasting.

    “Whilst they have been the victim of a crime, often individuals internalise feelings of guilt and shame, which can negatively affect an individual’s sense of self-worth and self-esteem.

    “Victim-blaming attitudes only exacerbate these feelings. Some feel so isolated and overwhelmed they consider suicide.”

    …read more

    Source:  BBC Com

    Children as young as NINE sexting naked snaps amid fears they could fall into hands of paedophiles

    BY MARK BRANAGAN

    Police warn youngsters their images could end up on social media or porn sites and say: ‘Once you press send, it’s gone’

    West Yorkshire Police are trying to educate children about the dangers of sending nude selfies

    Girls as young as nine are “sexting” naked snaps of themselves not realising the images could fall into the hands of sexual predators .

    West Yorkshire Police say 121 cases of children sending nude selfies to each other were reported to them last year, including the case of a girl aged nine.

    In the three months before March this year, the force had already logged 53 more incidents.

    This week, officers have been patrolling patrol bus and train stations across the county to raise awareness among youngsters of Child Sexual Exploitation.

    Once a photo has been sent to someone there’s no telling where it might end up

    A West Yorkshire Police spokesman said: “If you share an image of yourself online by photo, text or video, via your phone, tablet or computer always think first ‘Would I be OK with anyone and everyone seeing this?’

    “Any image of yourself that you send, can and might be shared by the person you sent it to. Once you press send, it is no longer in your control.

    “If you share a ‘nude’ or ‘underwear shot’ even with someone you trust, you are not able to control who they forward it to or where they save it.

    “It can be sent on to anyone or posted anywhere on the internet. It could end up on social networking sites or even porn sites.

    Children as young as nine are sexting

    “Once they have your image, they have it forever and could even use it against you.

    …read more

    Source: Mirror UK

    Thanks News Com AU, Brookings EDU, FindLaw, BBC, Mirror and for reading Sexting Sextortion, Porn

    This Site is Blocked By Some Browsers, WOT And Parental Controls Triggered By TERMS and TOPICS of Internet Crime; Child Porn, Pornography Addiction, Sexting, Sextortion, Sexual Harassment.  Children as young as 9 years old are Watching Porn and Sexting.

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    Dr Don
    Founder/Admin The Internet Crime Fighters Org, Internet Users Handbook, DrDony's Reviews and Resources, Author The Internet Users Handbook, See more http://about.me/drdony
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